Pennsylvania Salt Works waste book and ledger

Throughout the colonial period, salt was a vital commodity, used to preserve food and in the making of gunpowder. During the Revolutionary War, the British attempted to cripple the economy of the Middle Atlantic colonies by cutting off their supply of salt from the New England colonies and other ov...

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Bibliographic Details
Corporate Author: Pennsylvania Salt Works (Creator)
Collection:Pennsylvania Salt Works Waste Book and Ledger
Collection Number:Am.232
Format: Manuscript
Language:English
Subjects:
Physical Description: 0.2 Linear feet 0.2 linear feet, 2 volumes
Summary: Throughout the colonial period, salt was a vital commodity, used to preserve food and in the making of gunpowder. During the Revolutionary War, the British attempted to cripple the economy of the Middle Atlantic colonies by cutting off their supply of salt from the New England colonies and other overseas sources. In response, Pennsylvania established in 1776 a salt works near Barnegat Bay in Toms River, New Jersey--the Pennsylvania Salt Works. By 1778, so many salt works were in operation in New Jersey, that the legislature repealed its 1776 act to erect such operations. Furthermore, with the British evacuation of Philadelphia, trade was resumed and salt shortage was abated. Although some salt works continued to operate until the war's end, most closed by 1779. This collection consists of a wastebook and ledger, both of the same time period, 1776-79. Based on a notation in the latter volume, Thomas Savadge served as the firm's Superintendent during this period.