Jane Campbell papers

Sarah Jane Campbell (1844-1928), known throughout her life as ́Jane,́ was a writer, historian, and suffragist. She was born in Ireland but lived most of her life in Philadelphia. She was a frequent contributor of articles on various topics to local newspapers such as the Record, Bulletin, and Inqu...

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Collection: Jane Campbell Papers
Collection Number: 3203
Main Author: Campbell, Jane d. 1928. (Creator)
Format: Manuscript
Language: English
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LEADER 03652ntc a2200181 u 4500
001 ead-3203
008 140505i17861959xx eng d
040 |e dacs 
041 0 |a eng 
099 |a 3203 
100 1 |a Campbell, Jane  |d d. 1928.  |e creator 
245 1 |a Jane Campbell papers  |f 1786 - 1959  |g 1840 - 1920 
300 |a 45.4 Linear feet  |f ; 43 boxes, 1 volume 
520 |a Sarah Jane Campbell (1844-1928), known throughout her life as ́Jane,́ was a writer, historian, and suffragist. She was born in Ireland but lived most of her life in Philadelphia. She was a frequent contributor of articles on various topics to local newspapers such as the Record, Bulletin, and Inquirer. This large collection primarily consists of Campbell's scrapbooks and drafts of her writings. 
524 8 |a Cite as: [Indicate cited item or series here], Jane Campbell papers (Collection 3203), The Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 
541 1 |a Provenance unknown. 
545 |a Sarah Jane Campbell (1844-1928), known throughout her life as ́Jane,́ was a writer, historian, and suffragist. She was born in County Westmeath, Ireland, to John Campbell (1810-1894) and Margaret Hughes (1814-1881). She was the youngest daughter in a family that included one other surviving daughter, Marianne (or Mary Anne), and three surviving sons, Charles, John Hugh, and William James. In Philadelphia, she attended the Girlś Central and Normal School. She worked for much of her life as a contributor to Philadelphia newspapers the Record, Inquirer, and Public Ledger, for which she wrote original articles and numerous topics, as well as original, translated, or adapted poetry, prose, songs, and stories. Campbell also became very active in many civic and social organizations including the New Century Club, the Civic Club, the Audubon Society, the City History Society of Philadelphia, and the Site and Relic Society of Germantown. She was strongly interested in Catholicism and served for many years as the American Catholic Historical Societýs recording secretary. She also occasionally wrote or lectured for the organizations with which she was involved.Campbelĺs most enduring legacy resides in the early 20th century womeńs suffrage movement. She founded the Pennsylvania Womeńs Suffrage Association, served as its president for over 20 years, and later served on its board. She wrote frequently on the topic and her articles appeared in numerous newspapers and magazines, including Womeńs Progress, a magazine founded by her sister Marianne Campbell. She also spoke throughout the region in support of the cause and represented Philadelphia in the American Womeńs Suffrage Association. Campbell lived much of her life at 413 School (later School House) Lane in Germantown. Before her death in 1928, she resided there with at least two other siblings, sister Marianne and brother William James. Marianne Campbell (1840-1913), who worked mostly as a teacher in the Philadelphia public school system, was also a strong force in the local womeńs suffrage movement and served with the Womeńs Suffrage Society of Philadelphia. William James Campbell (1850-1931) was a publisher and bookseller who ran a shop that was previously owned by his father at 1623 Chestnut Street. Both he and his brother, John Hugh Campbell (1847-1897), were active members of the Society for the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick and the Hibernian Society. John published the History of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick and of the Hibernian Society for the Relief of Emigrants from Ireland in 1892.  
852 |a The Historical Society of Pennsylvania  |b Jane Campbell Papers  |l 3203