Isaac Newton letter to Robert Hooke, 1675

Letter from Isaac Newton to Robert Hooke from early in their harried correspondence. Newton here accepts Hooke's invitation for a private correspondence and a sort of collaboration, noting that "what is done before many witnesses is seldom without some further concern than that for truth: b...

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Bibliographic Details
Contributors: Newton, Isaac, 1642-1727 (Correspondent), Robert Hooke, 1635-1703 (Correspondent)
Collection:Simon Gratz autograph collection (#0250A)
Date:1675-02-05
Dimensions:19 x 30 cm
Box Number:Box 12/11
Folder Number:Folder 37
Format: Electronic
Subjects and Genres:
Copyright:Please contact Historical Society of Pennsylvania Rights and Reproductions (rnr@hsp.org)
Online Access:https://digitallibrary.hsp.org/index.php/Detail/objects/9792
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id dc-9792
recordtype Dc
hierarchy_top_id rs-4
hierarchy_top_title Digital Records
is_hierarchy_id 0
is_hierarchy_title 0
database_name_str_mv Digital Records
format Electronic
title Isaac Newton letter to Robert Hooke, 1675
spellingShingle Isaac Newton letter to Robert Hooke, 1675
title_sort Isaac Newton letter to Robert Hooke, 1675
title_txt_mv Isaac Newton letter to Robert Hooke, 1675
date_txt_mv 1675-02-05
year_str_mv 1675
contributor_txt_mv Newton, Isaac, 1642-1727 (Correspondent)
Robert Hooke, 1635-1703 (Correspondent)
author2 Newton, Isaac, 1642-1727
Robert Hooke, 1635-1703
author_facet Newton, Isaac, 1642-1727
Robert Hooke, 1635-1703
author2_role Correspondent
Correspondent
genre Correspondence
dimensions_txt_mv 19 x 30 cm
description Letter from Isaac Newton to Robert Hooke from early in their harried correspondence. Newton here accepts Hooke&#39;s invitation for a private correspondence and a sort of collaboration, noting that &quot;what is done before many witnesses is seldom without some further concern than that for truth: but what passes between friends in private usually deserves the name of consultation rather than contest.&quot; Newton also asks Hooke for critiques of his papers assuring him that, &quot;I am not so much in love with philosophical productions but oft I can make them yield to equity and friendship.&quot; In this letter, Newton also writes his famed remark &quot;if I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.&quot; It appears about two-thirds of the way down on the first page of the letter.<br /> <br /> Hooke and Newton&#39;s correspondence eventually soured over a variety of disagreements, often attributed to Hooke&#39;s reportedly bad temper and prickly disposition.
rights_statement_txt_mv Please contact Rights and Reproduction for more information.
collection Simon Gratz autograph collection
collection_number_str_mv 0250A
box_number_str Box 12/11
folder_number_str Folder 37
url https://digitallibrary.hsp.org/index.php/Detail/objects/9792
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score 13.052756